Monthly Archives: March 2016

Cutes Nails Tips And Trick

1. Line your nails with petroleum jelly or white craft glue before painting them for an easy cleanup.
If you’re working on a nail look that’s messy, use a cotton swab to rub petroleum jelly like Vaseline on the skin around your nails first. This creates a barrier between the polish and your skin so that after you’ve painted your nails, you can wipe off the Vaseline and any polish mistakes along with it.
Another way to prevent paint from drying on the skin around your nails is to paint around your nail with Elmer’s Glue first, and let it dry. Then, paint your nails with polish and peel off the glue when you’re finished to clean up.

2. To prevent the tips of your painted nails from chipping, paint two basecoat layers: one on the top half of your nail and the second coat over the entire nail.
Paint the first layer of your basecoat polish on the top half portion of your nails only. After your nails have dried, paint a second coat of polish, but this time cover the entire nail as you normally would. This technique will help the polish on the tips of your nails — which are more prone to chipping — last longer.

3. Use a white nail polish as your basecoat to make your nail color pop.

Unless your polish is super opaque, the natural tint of your fingers will change the color of your polish. To get the paint’s true color, add a layer of white nail polish first, and then go over it with your colored polish.

4. Paint your nail art designs on a plastic sandwich bag first, peel them off, and seal them on your nails with nail art glue or a clear topcoat for easy application.

If painting designs on your dominant hand is too difficult, try painting them on a plastic sandwich bag first. Paint a few thick coats of polish onto the plastic, and then add your design on top. After it dries, peel each design off the plastic, and adhere them to your nail with nail art glue or a clear topcoat.

5. Use paper hole reinforcement stickers as a guide for painting a half-moon mani.
Place the paper hole reinforcement stickers along the base of your nail, and seal it into place with a bobby pin or a nail art dotter tool. Paint your first coat on each nail along the stickers. Then one nail at a time, paint a second coat of paint, let it dry for a minute, and carefully remove the sticker. Use this tutorial for more tips on a half-moon mani.

6. Give your nails two-tone designs with tape.

After you’ve chosen two different polishes, paint one coat of the lighter polish on each nail, and seal it with a clear topcoat. After it is completely dry, apply two strips of tape over the tips of your nails so that they cross in the middle and create a point. Take the darker of the polishes, and paint a layer over the entire nail and on top of the tape. Let it dry for a minute, and then grab both ends of the tape and slowly peel them back at the same time for the finished look.

7. Use the tip of a pencil eyeliner to place tiny nail art accessories like rhinestones on your nails.

When your fingers or tweezers are too big to grab and place tiny jewels, use the tip of an eyeliner or lip pencil instead. The end of a pencil is tacky enough to grip the jewel from above and won’t get in the way of your design.

8. Create a French manicure with ease by looping a rubber band around your fingertip.
Take a rubber band and tie it in the middle. Loop one end over your thumb to create tension on the band, and align the other end over the top of your nail and just below the edge to create the French tip shape. Use the edge of the rubber band as a guide, and paint the tip of your nail.

9. Mix loose pigments with clear polish to make a custom nail shade.

Pour a little bit of eyeshadow pigment into a spoon, and then add a little bit of clear polish to it. Mix it all together with a cotton swab, grab a brush, and try out your new color.

10. Create a marbled effect by using drops of swirled nail polish and a cup of water.
Choose an accent finger and tape underneath and around your nail to protect your skin. Next, fill a small paper cup with filtered, room-temperature water. Grab two different colors of paint and add drops of each polish into the cup of water, alternating paints each time. Once you’ve added a few drops, grab an open paper clip and swirl the layers together to create the design you want. Then, stick your finger into the cup with your nail facing the paint layer. Holding your finger in the cup for a few seconds, use your paper clip to gather the rest of the paint away from your finger. Pull your finger out of the water and clean up the edges for the finished look.

11. Make your nail polish dry faster by soaking your nails in ice water after painting them.
Fill a bowl with ice and water, and soak your nails for a few minutes after painting them. The cold water will set the paint and help your nails dry faster.

12. Spray nonstick cooking spray on your nails to help the polish dry faster.
PAM nonstick cooking spray also works as a quick-dry spray. Hold the can a few inches away, and spray your nails evenly. Wait a few minutes, and then wash the oily residue off your hands.

13. Fix a smudged nail by adjusting the polish with the tip of your tongue.
If you accidentally smudge almost-dry nails, try readjusting the paint with the tip of your tongue instead of your finger. Your tongue is just soft enough to fix the paint without leaving any imprints. Only use this tip only when necessary though, and try not to lick your nail polish too often.

14. Remove stubborn polish by soaking cotton pads in nail polish remover, wrapping them around your nails, and securing them with foil.

To remove stubborn or glitter nail polish easily, soak a cotton pad in nail polish remover, and place it on your nail. Wrap a strip of foil around the cotton and your figure, and squeeze to secure it. Leave the foil wraps on your fingers for five minutes, and then slide off the foil and cotton at the same time. Your polish will come off with it.

15. Paint white craft glue as a basecoat before painting coats of glitter polish for easy removal.
One way to make glitter polish easy to remove is to paint Elmer’s Glue on your nails as a basecoat. Let the glue dry completely, and then paint over it with as many coats of glitter polish as you want. Whenever you’re ready to remove your polish, peel back the glue and the glitter will easily come off with it.

16. Roll your nail polish bottle instead of shaking it to avoid air bubbles.
Hold the bottle between your palms and rub your hands back and forth to stir the polish without creating bubbles.

17. Loosen a stubborn nail polish lid by soaking it in hot water.
Place the nail polish bottle upside down in a cup. Fill the glass with really hot water just high enough to cover the lid but not high enough to soak the bottle of paint (hot water can tamper with the consistency of the polish). Wait a few minutes, remove the nail polish bottle from the glass, and then open the loosened lid.

18. Unscrew a tight lid by wrapping a rubber band around the handle for better grip.
Wrap a large rubber band around the top of a nail polish bottle before trying to open it. The rubber will provide a better grip for twisting.

19. Spread petroleum jelly around the lip of the bottle before closing it to prevent the polish from drying shut.

With a cotton swab, wipe a small amount of petroleum jelly into the ridges on the top of the bottle. This will make it easier to open the next time and prevent it from sealing shut.

20. Store your nail polish upright in a box with painted stickers on top to indicate the colors.

To keep your polishes organized, paint a strip of polish on an adhesive file folder label, punch out a hole, and stick the paint sample on the top of the nail polish bottle. Repeat this for all of your polishes, set them in a box, and store them in a cool, dry place.

Tips for remove your blackheads naturally

The cause of blackheads

  • Hormones cause excess oil to be produced inside the pore, which prevents it from flowing naturally to the surface.
  • That excess flow of oil gets backed up, and then it mixes with built-up dead skin cells that cannot be shed normally.
  • The combination of too much oil and dead skin cells is then exposed to air, which causes it to oxidize and turns black.

What Can You Do to Get Rid of Blackheads?

To start getting rid of blackheads, you need products that can do all of the following:

  • Restore a normal flow of oil out of your pore by improving the shape of the pore lining.
  • Reduce and absorb excess oil.
  • Remove dead, built-up surface skin cells that aren’t shedding normally.

Sadly, lots of products, no matter what they claim, just aren’t capable of doing any of the above, mainly because the ingredients they contain actually make matters worse!

Although this might sound discouraging, don’t be dismayed. The Paula’s Choice Research Team is here to show you the real and effective ways to treat and remove blackheads.

Why Won’t My Blackheads Go Away?

Blackheads tend to be stubborn no matter what you do. Often, however, the problem persists or becomes worse because of the skin-care routine you are using. Here’s what you may doing wrong:

  • Shockingly, lots of products claimed to address blackheads contain irritants–alcohol, peppermint, menthol, lemon, lime, eucalyptus that actually increase oil production and make matters worse!
  • Irritation of any kind stimulates nerve endings in the skin that lead to the release of hormones that cause oil production, leading to more blackheads!
  • You can’t scrub blackheads away. Blackheads are too deep in the pore to be removed by surface scrubbing, and the irritation of the scrubbing can cause more oil production.
  • Blackheads cannot be pulled out of the pore by using pore strips. Pore strips remove only the very surface part of a blackhead, so you’ll see it again soon.
  • Microdermabrasion cannot reach the root of the problem, so any benefit you see from this procedure is only temporary.
  • Bar soap is a problem for fighting blackheads because the very ingredients that keep bar cleansers in their bar form can clog your pores. Your skin might feel squeaky clean with bar cleansers, but that feeling is drying and irritating, and that won’t help any blemish on your face.

How Can I Get Rid of My Blackheads?

The secret to solving any persistent skin problem is to use the right products and use them consistently. Here’s what you can do to reduce and maybe even eliminate your blackheads:

  • Use a gentle, water-soluble cleanser and a gentle washcloth to add a bit of manual exfoliation, but don’t overdo it. No irritating or drying cleansers should ever touch your face.
  • Avoid overly emollient or greasy moisturizers in blackhead-prone areas. As much as possible, use only gel, light fluid lotion, or liquid skin-care products because most of the ingredients that give lotions and creams their thick consistency can clog pores.
  • Use a well-formulated, leave-on salicylic acid–based exfoliant (also called BHA) that contains absolutely no irritants! Unfortunately, there are very few products available that hit this mark. Paula’s Choice offers the widest and most affordable selection of BHA (salicylic acid) exfoliants–with options for every skin type (you can check options from other lines by visiting Beautypedia and checking out our list of Best BHA Exfoliants.
  • Absorb excess oil. Those with oily skin will benefit from irritant-free clay masks and oil-blotting papers.

Can I Remove Blackheads Myself?

Extremely stubborn blackheads can be removed, but only by gently squeezing them out of the pore. Using a comedone extractor (a tool which helps extract blackheads without having to use your fingers) and light-handed squeezing can help a great deal.

Follow these steps for gentle, at-home blackhead extraction:

  • Wash your face with a gentle, water-soluble cleanser and follow with a well-formulated toner containing niacinamide to improve the shape of the pore.
  • Place a slightly warm (not hot), wet washcloth for about 2 to 3 minutes over the area you want to squeeze, and then pat the area dry.
  • Use a comedone extractor. First, center it over the blackhead and then gently press down and pull forward at the same time.
  • Next, to get more of the blackhead out, use a tissue over each finger (to prevent slipping and accidentally tearing your skin) and then apply even, soft pressure to the sides of the blackhead area, gently pressing down and then up around the affected pore.
  • Repeat this process only once. If nothing happens, it means that the blackhead cannot be removed with this first treatment, and continuing will most likely cause a wound and scabbing. You can try again in a few days.
  • Follow up with a well-formulated BHA (salicylic acid) exfoliant.

Blackheads or Sebaceous Filaments?

If you look closely at the tip of your nose, you might see tiny dots that resemble blackheads. These marks may be blackheads if they are quite dark, but the dark “dot” you see when you look very closely is also the tip of the columnar structures that fill your pores. They’re known as sebaceous filaments, naturally occurring hair-like formations that channel the flow of oil along the lining of the pore in which they lie

Sebaceous filaments are a natural part of skin’s follicle (pore) structure that everyone has; however, if your skin is oily or your pores are large and prone to becoming clogged, you’re more likely to notice them. Removing these filaments manually is possible, but they will come back within a month, as they’re supposed to be there, doing their job of helping oil move through the pore (follicle) lining. There isn’t anything you can do to keep them from returning, though ongoing use of a BHA exfoliant will help restore a more normal flow of oil out of the pore lining, reducing the risk of pores becoming clogged.

Dazzling Skin Tips

Just ask Kelly Campbell, a Los Angeles public relations consultant and mom. She regularly gets stopped by strangers complimenting her on her seemingly poreless, lit-from-within complexion.

The key to that gorgeous skin? She was born with it.

“Honestly, I’ve always been lucky to have good skin,” Campbell says. “Except when I was pregnant and I broke out from all the hormones, I’ve never had trouble with my skin.”

Yes, some people win the hereditary lottery when it comes to good skin. “Not all skin is created equal,” says Paula Bourelly, MD, a dermatology professor at Georgetown University. “You can’t underestimate the value of genetics.”

But genes are just the starting point. Beautiful skin is also about good skin care habits practiced day in and day out.

Here are, from top dermatologists and Campbell herself, the secrets to stunning skin.

No. 1 and No. 2: Smoking No, Sunscreen Yes

Imagine two people starting out with the same exact DNA. One smoked and sunbathed, the other avoided both. Would that make a difference in the appearance of their skin?

Yes.

A team of experts led by plastic surgeon Bahman Guyuron, MD, of Case Western Reserve University analyzed photographs of the faces of 186 pairs of identical twins taken at the Twins Day Festival in Twinsburg, Ohio. The twins had also filled out detailed questionnaires about their lives and daily habits.

Those who smoked and spent lots of time outdoors without wearing sunscreen looked years older than the brother or sister who shunned cigarettes and tanning. They had more fine lines, deeper and more plentifulwrinkles, and skin that was more mottled.

Bourelly isn’t surprised. “Many of the things that my patients complain about — dull, rough skin and uneven skin tone — are related to chronic sun exposure,” she says. “And studies have shown that smoking is associated with premature wrinkling.” Her advice:

  • Wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen that protects against both UVA and UVB rays with an SPF of 30 or higher, even on cloudy days.
  • Reapply your sunscreen every two to three hours you’re outdoors.
  • Don’t smoke — for the sake of your overall health as well as your appearance.